• Introduction-Intermediate
  • Painting

This course is intended for students wishing to develop their figure drawing beyond simple representation. Using a variety of media, students will learn to take chances and create lively and thought-provoking works. Consideration will also be given to different ways of reacting to and representing the figure - as a piece of design, a metaphoric symbol and within a conceptual framework. Examples of relevant artists` work will be shown. It is designed to get students with a basic familiarity with depicting the human form to stretch themselves, both technically and conceptually.

Explorations will be divided into two principal parts. The first part of the course will concentrate on the foundations of figure drawing: proportion, shape, gesture, line, value - but in ways intended to open possibilities rather than to arrive at a fixed method. Using models as a starting point, the second part of the course will allow for a variety of investigations of context, content, compositional design and materials within figurative compositions.

For less experienced students, the course provides an opportunity to gain confidence through taking creative chances in a supportive environment. For students with more developed drawing skills, it offers an opportunity to explore new possibilities in terms of conceptual approaches and alternative material use.

The course is not concerned so much with accurate depiction of the figure or proportions. Instead, emphasis is placed on taking chances, seeing the possibilities in the human form and having fun.


Spring Tuition: $375 | Model fee: $80 | Total: $455

Notes: The class will work from nude or costumed models.  The poses will range in length from gestures to 3 hours. It is recommended that students have taken an Introduction to Drawing course, or have some drawing and/or figure drawing experience. This is a 9-week course.

What you will learn

  • Emphasis on different ways of reacting to and representing the figure.
  • Looking beyond replication & rendering to interpretation and design.
  • Consideration of what is important about the figure and form and how to best capture and communicate that.
  • Discovering new ways of thinking about the figurative identity & form and the opportunities for new ways of expression.
  • Material and media exploration as relates to options for expression.
 
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